When the marketing becomes the product

As technology immerses into our daily life and disappears, value based marketing becomes available through new behaviors, inside situations where it is meaningful and useful.

This turns marketing into the experience surrounding the product – and in some instances becomes the experience people connect to and build relationships with. The marketing becomes the product, and the product becomes the marketing.

This is a presentation held for a class of students in electronic business development at BI, in Oslo Norway.

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5 Comments

  1. October 7
    Reply

    Top work (again), Helge

    It would be interesting to uncover the relationship between the appeal, originality and richness of a product, and the experiences one can weave around it.

    The Dark Knight had a web of experiences around the film with their ARG game, turning the marketing into content and the other way around. But the richness and appeal of those experiences came from the fact that the original film had a familiar mythology, interesting backstory and strong characters. Same goes with the campaign for HBO’s True Blood.

    It would be harder to extend a product into additional services or experiences if it is bland or mediocre (as 90% of products are). So this approach to marketing puts a stronger emphasis on creating and devising products which have enough depth and originality to inspire and fuel extensions.

  2. October 8
    Reply

    Excellent Chuck. Thanks for adding some stuff to it. Will make sure to read the link and get back to you :o)

    Best
    Helge

  3. October 8
    Reply

    Hi Tom , good thoughts.
    As an interesting reference to your Black Night case we have recently experienced a good ARG campaign in Norway for a local film release. Where the campaign attracted a lot more attention and visits then the film itself (so the marketing really became the product :o).

    The reference to the “90% of products are mediocre and bland” is interesting. Because even if the products are uninteresting, I don’t think the situations surrounding them are. (Or at least there would always be an interested niche community surrounding them). Which, combined with the ideas of Jonathan MacDonald would make them interesting: http://is.gd/45jFT

    It might also be that products themselves are to “small” to attract enough participants and develop a membership/loyalty model around them. But then product categories will have a bigger potential. As with The American Family Podcast by Whirpool and In the Motherhood by Suave and Sprint (as you know, I found the case in your book :o) Both these examples are inspirational to something that could have been more linked to the stuff I’m trying to write about. They didn’t focus on individual items, but belong to larger a context surrounding ranges or all of their products.

    A last reference might be Cyworld in Korea, where mega corporations already producing stuff for large portions of the South Korean households own the social network. How would membership on this platform link to subscriptions to at-home delivery services for these corporations’ products? (If I’m correct regarding Cyworld, it has been some years since I heard about the case): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyworld

    Thanks again for your ideas Tom, I always appreciate them.

    Best
    Helge

  4. […] When the marketing becomes the product As technology immerses into our daily life and disappears, value based marketing becomes available through new behaviors, inside situations where it is meaningful and useful. […]

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